Click the thumbnail to view larger image
Eddy Susanto, The Tale of Genji and Panji, 2017, Drawing pen, acrylic on canvas, 4 panels 120x80 cm
Eddy Susanto, The Tale of Genji and Panji, 2017, Drawing pen, acrylic on canvas, 4 panels 120x80 cm
Eddy Susanto, The Tale of Genji and Panji, 2017, Drawing pen, acrylic on canvas, 4 panels 120x80 cm

">
Eddy Susanto, The Tale of Genji and Panji, 2017, Drawing pen, acrylic on canvas, 4 panels 120x80 cm
Eddy Susanto, The Tale of Genji and Panji, 2017, Drawing pen, acrylic on canvas, 4 panels 120x80 cm
Eddy Susanto, The Tale of Genji and Panji, 2017, Drawing pen, acrylic on canvas, 4 panels 120x80 cm
Eddy Susanto, The Tale of Genji and Panji, 2017, Drawing pen, acrylic on canvas, 4 panels 120x80 cm
Eddy Susanto, The Tale of Genji and Panji, 2017, Drawing pen, acrylic on canvas, 4 panels 120x80 cm
Eddy Susanto, The Tale of Genji and Panji, 2017, Drawing pen, acrylic on canvas, 4 panels 120x80 cm
Eddy Susanto, The Tale of Genji and Panji, 2017, Drawing pen, acrylic on canvas, 4 panels 120x80 cm
Eddy Susanto, The Tale of Genji and Panji, 2017, Drawing pen, acrylic on canvas, 4 panels 120x80 cm
Eddy Susanto, The Tale of Genji and Panji, 2017, Drawing pen, acrylic on canvas, 4 panels 120x80 cm
Mujahidin Nurrahman, Black Diamond, 2016
Mujahidin Nurrahman, Do We Need To Think About The Universe, 2016
Mujahidin Nurrahman, Glory, 2017
Mujahidin Nurrahman, Invasion, 2016
Mujahidin Nurrahman, Invincible, 2017
Mujahidin Nurrahman, Kamon (Blue), 2016
Paper Hand Cut, plexiglass, 65 x 65 cm ">
Mujahidin Nurrahman, Kamon (Red), 2016
Mujahidin Nurrahman, Proud, 2017
Mujahidin Nurrahman, Reach, 2017
Mujahidin Nurrahman, Reach, Invincible, Glory, Proud, 2016
Mujahidin Nurrahman, The Core, 2016
Mujahidin Nurrahman, The Golden Leafs, 2017
From Friday March 17th 2017 to Sunday March 19th 2017
THE TALE OF GENJI AND PANJI


This work attempts to correlate between the Tale of Genji from Japan, and the Tale of Panji from Java. They both emerged in the Asian hemisphere and in the same frame of time.  Both works were literary masterpieces of their times, becoming milestones in the history of literature. 
Murasaki Shikibu, a Japanese woman, was the writer of The Tale of Genji, the world’s first novel.  In his book The Pleasures of Japanese Literature, Keene claims that Shikibu wrote “a masterpiece of Japanese fiction”, by using elements from the tradition of palace journals and Monogatari from a previous period, written with a mix of Chinese and Japanese characters as in Princess Kaguya or The Tale of Ise. She took and mixed writing style elements from Chinese history, narrative poetry and contemporary Japanese prose. 
The Tale of Genji is set during the end of the 9th century until the early 10th century, and Shikibu removed lore and fantasy items as found in earlier monogatari. Shikibu successfully captured her main theme, the fragility of life.

According to Helem McCullough, Shikibu’s work has a universal appeal, and thinks that The Tale of Genji transcends genres and time. The basic theme and background, love at the Heian castle, with the cultural assumptions, come from the mid-Heian period, yet Shikibu’s unique genius has made her work mean so much to many people as a strong statement about relationships between people, the impossibility of everlasting happiness in love, and most importantly, in a world full of misery, sensitivity towards other people’s feelings. Prince Genji admits that in each of his lovers, there is beauty of a woman and the fragility of life. Aside being recorded as the first novel in the world, The Tale of Genji is also known as the first romance novel of the genre. 

Similarly, The Tale of Panji from Java excelled as fiction with a historical background. As part of the Asian people, quite sizable, which played a prominent part in the political and intellectual history of South East Asia for a long period, Java inherited from almost all the world’s major civilizations. The heritage of our first written literature was obtained due to the flourishing of Hindu and Buddhist religions during the 7th to 14th centuries. The following period experienced a different way of delivery, the kidung (ballad), a narrative composition which was also conveyed through poetry. The difference of the poetry in kidung is based not on Sanskrit poetry, but was a local genius creation in the 14th century (Zoetmulder 1983:277-395). The stories were no longer sourced from Indian epics, and were based on historical events with local characters. 
At the end of Majapahit’s rule, following the kidung which usually told of heroes dying tragically in the battlefield, the cycle of Cerita Hikayat Panji (The Tale of Panji) emerged, as a mix between an epic, adventure tale and romance. The characters in Cerita Hikayat Panji were not anymore from myth or local history, but were fictional, although still referencing historical figures. Despite its change to fiction, the historical background is apparent in revealing the crisis around the Majapahit kingdom approaching its collapse. 

Jogjakarta, 1 February 2017
Eddy Susanto

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

THE BLACK GOLD


As I am writing and while you are reading these words, at the time when scientists study the moon, and humans land on planet Mars, WAR is raging around the globe and human suffering is reaching staggering levels.

Living every day- every hour in anguish,
in the shadow of aggression and attacks,  
and death looming before the eyes; 
when money is not the only problem;  
when losing family and relatives, friends and beloved people is becoming a reality; 
when the future is limited until tomorrow ... 

The noise of killing machines, 
the hissing of flying war planes; 
sirens foreboding danger,
years of conflict and endless wars. 

Killing machines continue to be produced, and admired, their power measured with great accuracy: are they fit to crash concrete, hard iron, bridges, schools, hospitals, houses of prayer? Will they make for effective attacks? Will they be able to accurately hit their targets? What about their impact? What price to pay for these machines?  
 
Wealthy and well-respected families are enriched by the sale of these machines. Delving from blood mines, every dollar spent equals a bullet to kill. Some TV station once showed images of craftsmen in a country in Asia assembling weapons for illegal sale. Survival may be the reason for these illegal actions. Such practic surely occur in many countries, on different survival scales. Meanwhile large companies produce lethal weapons as it means huge profits. 

In this exhibition I lay bare the anxieties of my heart:  the industry of these war instruments is no different from the production of cars, computers, toys and the like, absorbing massive numbers of laborers, and including  accurate planning, extensive research, precision in design and testing, and involving  market testing before actual marketing.

My works use symbols, anonymous but familiar. “Kamon”, for instance is like a family symbol found in various cultures.  Likening a blooming flower, but it’s made of Ak-47 weapons. “The Gold Leafs” use the AK-47 module as a token of wealth. Until this day I use the AK 47 module, because AK-47 has since a decade already become an icon of war, revolt and violence of modern man. In my work “Do We Need to Think about Universe” I use the silhouette of a popular US fighter, the F-16. In the center is an ornament circled by other ornamental circles. It is meant to meditate and concentrate our thoughts in intense contemplation.

With these works I would like to encourage everyone to contemplate on  whether we as human beings are humane in the best understanding of the word, whether we as human beings love others, appreciate the rights of others,  care about the sufferings of others, and end committing violence in order to stop the problem. Can we live in peace notwithstanding our difference in Race, Religion, Geographic location? Can we be such human beings, or would we rather be non-human that must live in conflict and violence? 

Bandung, February 2017
Mujahidin Nurrahman 




Future Exhibitions
Not yet available
Past Exhibitions
Friday March 17th 2017 to Sunday March 19th 2017
Thursday January 12th 2017 to Sunday January 15th 2017
Thursday March 17th 2016 to Sunday April 10th 2016
Thursday January 21st 2016 to Sunday January 24th 2016
Friday December 12th 2014 to Sunday January 18th 2015
Saturday September 6th 2014 to Sunday October 5th 2014
Friday April 18th 2014 to Sunday May 18th 2014
Friday May 10th 2013 to Friday May 24th 2013